The State of Britain

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Thames Valley Berkshire LEP the most productive but the best productivity growth in Coventry and Warwickshire, the East Midlands has the wealthiest and poorest parts of the UK

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ONS figures last month demonstrated that high levels of hours worked and high productivity in London and the South East pulled up the UK average so much that the other ten ‘regions’ of the UK fell below it.

The ONS has now released data for a longer period and at a subregional level.

Perhaps the most useful is the 2018 results for the 44 enterprise regions in the UK which comprise the 38 English local enterprise partnerships (LEPs) and six enterprise regions in Scotland, Wales and the border regions.

Thames Valley Berkshire LEP had the best productivity (in terms of hours and jobs) in 2018 at 35% above the UK average whereas the Black Country LEP at 24% below was the worst. Labour productivity increased in 32 out of 44 enterprise regions in the UK between 2010 and 2018.

In terms of productivity growth between 2010 and 2018 the Coventry and Warwickshire LEP was top with growth of 16%. Twelve economic regions recorded productivity levels lower in 2018 than 2010. The worst performer was the Buckinghamshire Thames Valley LEP which saw productivity drop by 11%.

The UK is divided into 168 statistical areas, of this labour productivity increased in 105. The highest productivity growth over 2010 to 2018 occurred in areas of West London followed by Warwickshire, Solihull and Milton Keynes. Tower Hamlets in London was best and had productivity 75% above the UK average whereas Powys in Wales was the worst at –43%.

The UK is also divided into 41 larger statistical areas, of these Inner London West had the highest productivity at 48% above the UK average. Four other areas of London were also in the top 10 subregions with the highest labour productivity outside London seen in Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire, with labour productivity 17% above the UK average. Overall, 11 out of the 41 areas had labour productivity above the UK average.

The ONS has also published average household disposal income estimates for England and Wales in 2018. The incomes shown are after tax and housing costs are taken off.  The analysis has shown that 87% of 7201 local areas had an average household income of between £22,500 and £39,200; within this over a third were between £28,000 and £33,600.

Of the 50 areas with the highest total incomes, 41 were in London with the lowest incomes more widely spread geographically across England and Wales. The North East, East England, London, and the South East had no local areas in the bottom 50.

The wealthiest area in England and Wales was Mickleover in Derby with incomes of £52,200 and the poorest was Highfield North in Leicester with £12,500. The two areas are 30 miles from each other and ranked 7200 places apart.

UK stats

UK GDP showed no growth in the three months to January and there was no growth in the month itself. Over the quarter, construction performed well and was up by 1.4% but production fell by 1% and services were flat. Annual growth was 1.1%.

GDP rose by 0.1% in the euro area and by 0.2% in the EU27 during the fourth quarter of 2019, according to Eurostat. Annually GDP rose by 1% in the euro area and by 1.2% in the EU27.

Key European economies remain sluggish; over the quarter Germany was at a standstill and France contracted by 0.1%, with Italy shrinking by 0.3%. Annually, Germany grew by 0.5% and France by 0.9% with 0.1% growth in Italy.

The UK labour market was largely unchanged, with the level of employment increasing to a record high of 32.99m and the level of unemployment stable at 1.34m or 3.9%.

The euro area unemployment rate was 7.4% in January 2020, with the EU27 rate at 6.6%. The lowest unemployment rate in January 2020 was 2% in the Czech Republic and the highest was 16.5% in Greece.

UK inflation was 1.7% in February 2020 down from 1.8% in January. Key downward contributions came from motor fuels, games, toys and hobbies with the biggest risers housing, water, electricity and gas.

Euro area annual inflation was 1.2% in February, down from 1.4% in January. European Union annual inflation was 1.6% in February 2020, down from 1.7% in January. A year earlier, the Euro area rate was 1.5%.

The UK public sector deficit in February was £0.3bn, £0.3bn less than in February 2019. Debt at the end of February 2020 was £1,791bn, 79.1% of GDP, a decrease of 1.1% on February 2019.

The Bernards Heath area of St Albans and Central Great Yarmouth are the wealthiest and poorest areas of the region, all 5 LEPs record productivity below the UK average

Reading Time: 3 minutes

The ONS has published average household disposal income estimates for England and Wales in 2018. The incomes shown are after tax and housing costs are taken off.  The analysis has shown that 87% of local areas had an average household income of between £22,500 and £39,200; within this over a third were between £28,000 and £33,600.

Of the 50 areas with the highest total incomes, 41 were in London, with the lowest incomes more widely spread geographically across England and Wales. The North East, East England, London, and the South East had no local areas in the bottom 50.

The wealthiest area in England and Wales was Mickleover in Derby with incomes of £52,200 and the poorest was Highfield North in Leicester with £12,500. The two areas are 30 miles from each other and ranked 7200 places apart.

The wealthiest area of the EE was the Bernards Heath area of St Albans with £45,200. This ranked the area 29th out of the 7,201 areas recorded. The poorest area of the region was Central Great Yarmouth with £17,000. This area was ranked 7,062 out of the 7,201 areas of the UK recorded.

Like most regions of the UK, output per hour in the EE is below the UK average. Productivity per hour in the region was 4.6% below the UK average which ranked the region fourth nationally for 2018. One reason for this is the high levels of hours worked and high productivity in London and South East which pulls up the UK average so much that all other regions fall below it.

The ONS has now released data for a longer period and at a subregional level. This gives further insight into the EE’s performance.

Perhaps the most useful is the 2018 results for the 44 enterprise regions in the UK which comprise the 38 English local enterprise partnerships (LEPs) and six enterprise regions in Scotland, Wales and the border regions.

Thames Valley Berkshire LEP had the best productivity (in terms of hours and jobs) in 2018 at 35% above the UK average whereas the Black Country LEP at 24% below was the worst.

All of the regions 5 LEPs recorded productivity below the UK average. Hertfordshire was the best and was ranked 10th at just 0.2% below, the other four LEPs all performed reasonably well and ranged from 4% to 9% below the UK average. SEMLEP, Cambridge & Peterborough LEP and the South East LEP were ranked 13th, 17th and 18th. New Anglia LEP at 9% below was ranked 21st out of 44 economic regions.

In terms of productivity growth between 2010 and 2018 the Coventry and Warwickshire LEP was top with growth of 16%. Twelve economic regions recorded productivity levels lower in 2018 than 2010. The worst performer was the Buckinghamshire Thames Valley LEP which saw productivity drop by 11%.

The EE’s results for productivity growth were more mixed. With growth of 7%, SEMLEP was the sixth best in the UK. The Cambridge & Peterborough LEP was ranked 12th nationally with growth of 5%, beating the New Anglia LEP which was ranked 17th with 3% growth. Two of the region’s LEPs recorded productivity levels lower in 2018 than 2010; the South East at -0.2% was ranked 34th, three places above Hertfordshire LEP which recorded -0.6% .

All of the EE’s three subregions recorded productivity below the UK average. Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire was just below at -0.5%, Essex -6% and East Anglia -7%.

At district level, led by Luton (+5%), five of the EE’s economic regions recorded productivity above the UK average. The other 11 areas dropped below the UK average, with Southend-on-Sea recording the lowest productivity at -30%.

The growth in hours worked between 2010 and 2018 in Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire area was 26%, beating Essex which recorded 17% and East Anglia on 11%. In UK terms this level of growth was in the top half of the country’s 40 subregions with Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire ranked third.

If the increase in economic output is also factored in then the sub regional performances are mixed. East Anglia was ranked 14th in the UK with growth of 4%, Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire was placed 28th with 1% and Essex was 36th with -0.4%. 

More data from the ONS showed unemployment in the region was 9,000 higher at 110,000 between November and January; the uplift of 0.3% took the overall rate to 3.4%. Northern Ireland had the lowest rate of 2.4%, the North East the highest at 6.2%, with the UK rate at 3.9%.

The South East had the highest employment rate at 80% which compared with 78.4% in the EE where 3.2m are employed; the UK rate was 76.5%.

The EE’s average property price decreased by 2.2% to £286,999, which took the annual decrease to 0.6%. In comparison, UK prices decreased by 1.1% to £231,185 during January, an annual growth rate of 1.3%.

Mickleover in Derby the wealthiest area in England but Highfield North in Leicester the poorest, all of the region’s LEPs see productivity growth

Reading Time: 3 minutes

The ONS has published average household disposal income estimates for England and Wales in 2018. The incomes shown are after tax and housing costs are taken off.  The analysis has shown that 87% of local areas had an average household income of between £22,500 and £39,200; within this over a third were between £28,000 and £33,600.

Of the 50 areas with the highest total incomes, 41 were in London, with the lowest incomes more widely spread geographically across England and Wales. The North East, East England, London, and the South East had no local areas in the bottom 50.

The wealthiest area in England and Wales was Mickleover in Derby with incomes of £52,200 and the poorest was Highfield North in Leicester with £12,500. The two areas are 30 miles from each other and ranked 7200 places apart.

Four other areas of the region also made the wealthiest top ten; Allestree in Derby, Lady Bay in Nottingham and parts of South Northamptonshire.

Like most regions of the UK, output per hour in the EM is below the UK average. Productivity per hour in the region was 13.5% below the UK average which ranked the region eighth nationally for 2018. One reason for this is the high levels of hours worked and high productivity in London and South East which pulls up the UK average so much that all other regions fall below it.

The ONS has now released data for a longer period and at a subregional level. This gives further insight into EM’s performance.

Perhaps the most useful is the 2018 results for the 44 enterprise regions in the UK which comprise the 38 English local enterprise partnerships (LEPs) and six enterprise regions in Scotland, Wales and the border regions.

Thames Valley Berkshire LEP had the best productivity (in terms of hours and jobs) in 2018 at 35% above the UK average whereas the Black Country LEP at 24% below was the worst.

All of the region’s LEPs recorded productivity below the UK average. The best was SEMLEP ranked 13th at 4% below, the rest all performed poorly and ranged from 10% to 18% below the UK average. Leicestershire LEP, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire LEP and Greater Lincolnshire LEP were ranked 24th, 28th and 36th.

In terms of productivity growth between 2010 and 2018 the Coventry and Warwickshire LEP was top with growth of 16%. Twelve economic regions recorded productivity levels lower in 2018 than 2010. The worst performer was the Buckinghamshire Thames Valley LEP which saw productivity drop by 11%.

The EM’s results for productivity growth were better. With growth of 7% SEMLEP was ranked 6th in the UK. Greater Lincolnshire LEP was ranked 18th nationally with growth of 3% just beating Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire LEP. Leicestershire LEP was ranked 29th with 1% growth which meant none of the region’s LEPs recorded productivity levels lower in 2018 than 2010.

Despite this, all of the EM’s three subregions recorded productivity below the UK average. Leicestershire, Rutland and Northamptonshire -12%, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire -14% and Lincolnshire -18%.

At a county level, with the exception of South Nottinghamshire (+0.2%) all of the EM’s economic regions recorded productivity below the UK average. North Northamptonshire had the lowest productivity, 24% below the UK average.

The growth in hours worked between 2010 and 2018 in Leicestershire, Rutland and Northamptonshire was 11%, beating Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire which recorded 9%. In UK terms this level of growth was in the top half of the country’s 40 subregions. Lincolnshire grew 5% which ranked 38th.

If the increase in economic output is also factored in then the sub regional performances are also good, mirroring the region’s LEPs. Lincolnshire was ranked 8th in the UK with growth of 8%, Leicestershire, Rutland and Northamptonshire was placed 15th with 4% and Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire 17th with 3%. 

More data from the ONS showed unemployment in the region was 8,000 higher at 98,000 between November and January; the uplift of 0.3% took the overall rate to 3.9%. Northern Ireland had the lowest rate of 2.4%, the North East the highest with 6.2%, with the UK rate at 3.9%.

The South East had the highest employment rate at 80% which compared with 78% in the EM where 2.4m are employed; the UK rate was 76.5%.

The EM’s average property price decreased by 0.4% to £195,707, which took the annual increase to 2.3%. In comparison, UK prices decreased by 1.1% to £231,185 during January, an annual growth rate of 1.3%.

Highgate and Edmonton are the wealthiest and poorest areas of the capital, productivity in London is high but the city’s productivity growth is very mixed

Reading Time: 3 minutes

The ONS has published average household disposal income estimates for England and Wales in 2018. The incomes shown are after tax and housing costs are taken off.  The analysis has shown that 87% of local areas had an average household income of between £22,500 and £39,200; within this over a third were between £28,000 and £33,600.

Of the 50 areas with the highest total incomes, 41 were in London, with the lowest incomes more widely spread geographically across England and Wales. The North East, East England, London, and the South East had no local areas in the bottom 50.

The wealthiest area in England and Wales was Mickleover in Derby with incomes of £52,200 and the poorest was Highfield North in Leicester with £12,500. The two areas are 30 miles from each other and ranked 7200 places apart.

The wealthiest area of the capital, which just pipped Kensington and Chelsea, was Highgate, with £51,600. This ranked the area 2nd out of the 7,201 areas recorded. The poorest area of London was the Edmonton area of Enfield with £18,300. This area was ranked 6,949 out of the 7,201 areas recorded.

Unlike most regions of the UK, output per hour in the capital is way above the UK average. Productivity in London was 32% above the norm which unsurprisingly ranked the city top in the UK. The SE and London record high levels of hours worked and their high productivity pulls up the UK average so much that all other regions fall below it.

The ONS has now released data for a longer period and at a subregional level. This gives further insight into London’s performance.

Perhaps the most useful is the 2018 results for the 44 enterprise regions in the UK which comprise the 38 English local enterprise partnerships (LEPs) and six enterprise regions in Scotland, Wales and the border regions.

The SE’s Thames Valley Berkshire LEP had the best productivity (in terms of hours and jobs) in 2018 at 35% above the UK average whereas the West Midland’s Black Country LEP at 24% below was the worst.

Eight of the 44 enterprise regions in the UK recorded productivity above the UK average; at +32%, London’s LEP was ranked second.

In terms of productivity growth between 2010 and 2018 the Coventry and Warwickshire LEP was top with growth of 16%. Twelve economic regions recorded productivity levels lower in 2018 than 2010. The worst performer was the SE’s Buckinghamshire Thames Valley LEP which saw productivity drop by 11%.

Productivity growth in the capital was +1.4%, which ranked London 28th.

All of the capital’s five subregions recorded productivity above the UK average. Inner London – West was top with +48%, with Outer London – East bottom in the city with +12%.

On districts, led by Tower Hamlets (+75%), nineteen of the London’s economic regions recorded productivity above the UK average. Only two dropped below the UK average, with Hackney and Newham recording the lowest productivity at -6%.

The growth in hours between 2010 and 2018 in Inner London – East was 37%, beating the capital’s other subregions, with Outer London – West and North West the lowest, recording 16%. In UK terms these levels of growth were in the top ten of the country’s 41 subregions.

If the increase in economic output is also factored in, then the sub regional performances are mixed. Outer London – West and North West was ranked 1st in the UK with growth of 12%, Inner London – West was placed 10th with growth of 10% and Outer London South was 26th with grown of 2%. In comparison, Outer London – East and North East was ranked 40th, only beating Inner London – East, which saw productivity decline by 10%, the most in the UK.

More data from the ONS showed unemployment in the capital was 3,000 higher at 224,000 between November and January; the slight uplift left the overall rate unchanged at 4.5%. Northern Ireland had the lowest rate of 2.4%, with the North East the highest at 6.2%, with the UK rate at 3.9%.

The South East had the highest employment rate at 80% which compared with 76% in London where 4.8m are employed; the UK rate was 76.5%.

London’s average property price decreased by 1.1% to £476,588, which took the annual increase to 1.4%. In comparison, UK prices decreased by 1.1% to £231,185 during January, an annual growth rate of 1.3%.

Cleadon the wealthiest part of the region with Grangetown and Berwick Hills/Gresham the poorest, both of the region’s LEPs record below average productivity growth

Reading Time: 3 minutes

The ONS has published average household disposal income estimates for England and Wales in 2018. The incomes shown are after tax and housing costs are taken off.  The analysis has shown that 87% of local areas had an average household income of between £22,500 and £39,200; within this over a third were between £28,000 and £33,600.

Of the 50 areas with the highest total incomes, 41 were in London, with the lowest incomes more widely spread geographically across England and Wales. The North East, East England, London, and the South East had no local areas in the bottom 50.

The wealthiest area in England and Wales was Mickleover in Derby with incomes of £52,200 and the poorest was Highfield North in Leicester with £12,500. The two areas are 30 miles from each other and ranked 7200 places apart.

The wealthiest area of the North East was the Cleadon area of South Tyneside with £37,900. This ranked the area 333rd out of the 7,201 areas of the UK recorded. The poorest areas of the region were Grangetown (Redcar) and the Berwick Hills/Gresham areas of Middlesborough both with £15,800. These areas were ranked 7,141 out of the 7,201 areas of the UK recorded.

Like most regions of the UK, output per hour in the NE is below the UK average. Productivity per hour in the NE was 13.5% below the UK average which ranked the region eighth nationally for 2018. One reason for this is the high levels of hours worked and high productivity in London and South East which pulls up the UK average so much that all other regions fall below it.

The ONS has now released data for a longer period and at a subregional level. This gives further insight into the NE’s performance.

Perhaps the most useful data is the 2018 results for the 44 enterprise regions in the UK which comprise the 38 English local enterprise partnerships (LEPs) and six enterprise regions in Scotland, Wales and the border regions.

Thames Valley Berkshire LEP had the best productivity (in terms of hours and jobs) in 2018 at 35% above the UK average whereas the Black Country LEP at 24% below was the worst.

At 9% below the UK average Tees Valley LEP was ranked 20th, better than the North East LEP which was ranked 31st at 14% below.

In terms of productivity growth between 2010 and 2018 the Coventry and Warwickshire LEP was top with growth of 16%. Twelve economic regions recorded productivity levels lower in 2018 than 2010. The worst performer was the Buckinghamshire Thames Valley LEP which saw productivity drop by 11%.

Tees Valley LEP was ranked 24th with growth of 1.7%, again better than the North East LEP which was ranked 35th with productivity dropping by 0.4% over the eight years.

With the exception of Sunderland (+8%) all of the NE’s economic regions recorded productivity below the UK average. Northumberland had the lowest productivity, 23% below the UK average.

The growth in hours worked between 2010 and 2018 in Northumberland and Tyne and Wear was 5.5%, better than in Tees Valley and Durham which recorded 2.1%. In UK terms this level of growth was in the bottom five of the country’s 41 subregions.

If the increase in economic output is factored in then the sub regional performances are similar. Northumberland and Tyne and Wear was ranked 25th in the UK with growth of c2% and Tees Valley and Durham was ranked 37th with -2%.

More data from the ONS showed unemployment in the region was 1,000 higher at 80,000 between November and January; the uplift of 0.1% took the rate to 6.2%, a UK outlier, at 4.6% Yorkshire & The Humber was next highest. Northern Ireland had the lowest rate of 2.4%, with the UK rate at 3.9%.

The South East had the highest employment rate at 80% which compared with 71.7% in the NE where 1.2m are employed; the UK rate was 76.5%.

The NE’s average property price decreased the most in England over the month, by 2.6% to £126,592. The drop took the annual increase to 0.9%. In comparison, UK prices decreased by 1.1% to £231,185 during January, an annual growth rate of 1.3%.

Mid and East Antrim the province’s only area to record productivity above the UK average, productivity growth in the UK top ten and NI retains the unemployment crown

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Like most ‘regions’ of the UK, output per hour in NI is below the UK average. Productivity per hour in the province was 16% below the UK average which ranked NI tenth nationally for 2018. One reason for this is the high levels of hours worked and high productivity in London and South East which pulls up the UK average so much that all other regions fall below it.

The ONS has now released data for a longer period and at a subregional level. This gives further insight into NI’s performance. At the district level Northern Ireland data is only available for GVA per filled job, whereas the data for other parts of the UK also includes GVA per hour worked so although similar the stats are not exactly comparable.

Perhaps the most useful data is the 2018 results for the 44 enterprise regions in the UK which comprise the 38 English local enterprise partnerships (LEPs) and six enterprise regions in Scotland, Wales and the border regions.

Thames Valley Berkshire LEP had the best productivity (in terms of hours and jobs) in 2018 at 35% above the UK average whereas the Black Country LEP at 24% below was the worst. At -16% Invest NI would be ranked around 33rd.

In terms of productivity growth between 2010 and 2018 the Coventry and Warwickshire LEP was top with growth of 16%. Twelve economic regions recorded productivity levels lower in 2018 than 2010. The worst performer was the Buckinghamshire Thames Valley LEP which saw productivity drop by 11%. At c5% growth Invest NI would likely be ranked in the UK top 10.

With the exception of Mid and East Antrim (+18%) all of the province’s economic regions recorded productivity below the UK average. Even Belfast was 0.5% below the UK average. Derry City and Strabane had the lowest productivity, 26% below the UK average.

The growth in hours worked between 2010 and 2018 in Belfast was 17%, beating Lisburn and Castlereagh which recorded 11%, Derry City/Strabane and Antrim/Newtownabbey were both on 9%. In UK terms this level of growth was in the top half of the country’s subregions. Mid and East Antrim saw productivity decline by 10%.

If the increase in economic output is also factored in then at the ‘sub regional’ level NI’s performance would rank in the UK top ten (mirroring Invest NI). Outer London – West and North West was best in the UK with growth of 12% with Inner London – East the worst in the UK at -10%. NI growth was 5%,

More data from the ONS showed unemployment in the country was 1,000 higher at 22,000 between November and January; the increase of 0.1% took the overall rate to 2.4%, the lowest in the UK. The NE had the highest rate at 6.2% with the UK rate at 3.9%.

The South East had the highest employment rate at 80% which compared with 72.3% in NI where 0.9m are employed; the UK rate was 76.5%.

NI’s  average property price increased by 0.2% to £140,190 in Q4 2019, which took the annual increase to 2.5%. In comparison, UK prices decreased by 1.1% to £231,185 during January, an annual growth rate of 1.3%.

Addlington and Dudlow’s Green the wealthiest parts of the region with Blackpool South the poorest, Cheshire and Warrington LEP the most productive but the best growth seen in Lancashire

Reading Time: 3 minutes

The ONS has published average household disposal income estimates for England and Wales for 2018. The incomes shown are after tax and housing costs are taken off. The analysis has shown that 87% of local areas had an average household income of between £22,500 and £39,200; within this over a third were between £28,000 and £33,600.

Of the 50 areas with the highest total incomes, 41 were in London, with the lowest incomes more widely spread across England and Wales. The North East, East England, London, and the South East had no local areas in the bottom 50.

The wealthiest area in England and Wales was Mickleover in Derby with incomes of £52,200 and the poorest was Highfield North in Leicester with £12,500. The two areas are 30 miles from each other and ranked 7200 places apart.

The wealthiest areas of the North West were the Addlington area of Cheshire and the Dudlow’s Green of Warrington with incomes of £39,800. This ranked the areas 184th out of the 7,201 districts of the UK recorded. The poorest area of the region was Blackpool South with £13,300. This area was ranked 7,199 out of the 7,201 areas of the UK recorded.

Last month the ONS published analysis which showed that like most regions of the UK, output per hour in the NW is below the UK average. Productivity per hour in the NW was 8.4% below the UK average which ranked the region fifth nationally for 2018. One reason for this is the high levels of hours worked and high productivity in London and the South East which pulls up the UK average so much that all other regions fall below it.  

The ONS has now released data for a longer period and at a subregional level. This gives further insight into the NW’s performance.

First, the 2018 results for the 44 enterprise regions in the UK, which comprise the 38 English local enterprise partnerships (LEPs) and six enterprise regions in Scotland, Wales and the border regions.

Thames Valley Berkshire LEP had the best productivity (in terms of hours) in 2018 at 35% above the UK average, whereas the Black Country LEP at -24% was the worst.

At +6%, the Cheshire and Warrington LEP was one of eight economic regions which beat the UK average and was ranked 5th, all of the NW’s other LEPs recorded productivity below the UK average. Liverpool City region was 19th at 8% below, Lancashire LEP 23rd and Greater Manchester 25th at -11% but the worst regional performer was Cumbria at -14% which ranked it 29th.

In terms of productivity growth between 2010 and 2018, the Coventry and Warwickshire LEP was top with growth of 16%. Twelve economic regions recorded productivity levels lower in 2018 than 2010. The worst performer was the Buckinghamshire Thames Valley LEP which saw productivity drop by 11%.

The NW’s results for productivity growth (rather than overall productivity) were more mixed. With growth of 8.8% Lancashire was the regional star and was ranked 3rd nationally, just beating Cumbria which was ranked fourth with 7.5% growth. Cheshire and Warrington LEP grew by 3.8% and was ranked 15th but the region’s other two LEPs recorded productivity levels lower in 2018 than 2010. Greater Manchester was -0.5% and was ranked 36th which was four places better than Liverpool City region at -3.3%.

On subregions rather then enterprise areas, with the exception of Cheshire East (+8%) and Greater Manchester South West (+0.3%), all of the NW’s subregions recorded productivity below the UK average. Greater Manchester North East had the lowest productivity in the region, 27% below the UK average.

The growth in hours worked between 2010 and 2018 in Greater Manchester was 17%, just beating Cheshire which recorded 16%. In UK terms this level of growth was in the top ten of the country’s 41 subregions. Merseyside grew by 9% and Lancashire by 7% but Cumbria recorded a decline of 3.7%, the only part of the UK to do so.

If the increase in economic output is factored in then the sub regional performances are similar to the geographically associated LEPs. So despite Cumbria recording a decline of 3.7% in hours worked, it was ranked 7th in the UK with growth of c8%.

More data from the ONS showed unemployment in the region was 16,000 higher at 163,000 between November and January; the uplift of 0.4% took the rate to 4.4%. Northern Ireland had the lowest rate of 2.4%, the North East the highest at 6.2%, with the UK rate at 3.9%.

The South East had the highest employment rate at 80% which compared with 75.8% in the NW where 3.5m are employed; the UK rate was 76.5%.

The NW’s average property price decreased by 1.5% to £164,769 during the month which took the annual increase to 2.1%. In comparison, UK prices decreased by 1.1% to £231,185 during January, an annual growth rate of 1.3%.

Edinburgh leads Scotland’s productivity growth; Scottish Enterprise outperforms Highlands and Islands Enterprise at the development agency level

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The Scottish economy grew by 0.2% in the final three months of 2019, according to Scottish Government figures, with construction growing by 0.7% and services 0.5% but production contracted by 1.2. Over the same period UK GDP was flat.

Compared to the same quarter last year, Scotland’s GDP grew by 0.7%. Over the same period, the UK as a whole grew by 1.1%. Overall GDP grew by 0.8% in 2019 compared with 2018. The UK as a whole grew by 1.4% over the same period.

The largest single contribution to growth in the final three months of 2019 came from Business Services & Finance at 0.22% and within this professional, scientific & technical industries added the most at 0.7%.

Like most ‘regions’ of the UK, output per hour in Scotland is below the UK average. Productivity per hour in the country was c3% below the UK average which ranked the country third for 2018. One reason for this is the high levels of hours worked and high productivity in London and South East which pulls up the UK average so much that all other regions fall below it.

The ONS has now released data for a longer period and at a subregional level. This gives further insight into the Scottish performance.

Perhaps the most useful is the 2018 results for the 44 enterprise regions in the UK which comprise the 38 English local enterprise partnerships (LEPs) and six enterprise regions in Scotland, Wales and the border regions.

Thames Valley Berkshire LEP had the best productivity (in terms of hours and jobs) in 2018 at 35% above the UK average whereas the Black Country LEP at 24% below was the worst.

Unsurprisingly, both of the country’s economic agencies recorded productivity just below the UK average. Scottish Enterprise was the best and was ranked 12th at 3% below. Highlands and Islands Enterprise was ranked 15th at c5% below.

In terms of productivity growth between 2010 and 2018 the Coventry and Warwickshire LEP was top with growth of 16%. Twelve economic regions recorded productivity levels lower in 2018 than 2010. The worst performer was the Buckinghamshire Thames Valley LEP which saw productivity drop by 11%.

The country’s results for productivity growth were more mixed. With growth of 5.1% Scottish Enterprise was the tenth best in the UK. Highlands and Islands Enterprise was ranked 30th nationally with growth of just 0.5%.

Two of the country’s subregions recorded productivity above the UK average with Eastern Scotland at +11% and North Eastern Scotland +9%. Of the other three, Highlands and Islands was 4% below the average with West Central Scotland -13% and Southern Scotland -23%.

At district level, led by Edinburgh (+26%), eight of the country’s areas recorded productivity above the UK average. The other fifteen areas dropped below the UK average, with South Ayrshire recording the lowest productivity at -23%.

The growth in hours worked between 2010 and 2018 in West Central Scotland was 9%, beating Highlands and Islands and Eastern Scotland which recorded 7%, and North Eastern Scotland on 6% with Southern Scotland on 5%. In UK terms this level of growth was in the bottom half of the UK’s 41 subregions, with Southern Scotland ranked 39th.

If the increase in economic output is also factored in then the sub regional performances are more mixed. Eastern Scotland was again top and ranked 16th in the UK with growth of 4%, West Central Scotland was placed 27th with 5% growth, just beating Southern Scotland by one place. Highlands and Islands was ranked 23rd with 2% growth but with only 0.7% growth, North Eastern Scotland was ranked 31st.

More data from the ONS showed unemployment in the country was 4,000 lower at 96,000 between November and January; the fall of 0.2% took the overall rate to 3.5%. Northern Ireland had the lowest rate of 2.4%, the North East of England the highest at 6.2%, with the UK rate at 3.9%.

The South East had the highest employment rate at 80% which compared with 74.9% in Scotland where 2.7m are employed; the UK rate was 76.5%.

Scotland’s average property price increased by 0.6% to £152,121, which took the annual increase to 1.6%. In comparison, UK prices decreased by 1.1% to £231,185 during January, an annual growth rate of 1.3%.

Abingdon in Oxfordshire and Portsea in Portsmouth are the wealthiest and poorest areas of the region, Thames Valley Berkshire LEP had the best productivity in the UK and the SE’s employment rate now top

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The ONS has published average household disposal income estimates for England and Wales in 2018. The incomes shown are after tax and housing costs are taken off.  The analysis has shown that 87% of local areas had an average household income of between £22,500 and £39,200; within this over a third were between £28,000 and £33,600.

Of the 50 areas with the highest total incomes, 41 were in London with the lowest incomes more widely spread geographically across England and Wales. The North East, East England, London, and the South East had no local areas in the bottom 50.

The wealthiest area in England and Wales was Mickleover in Derby, with incomes of £52,200 and the poorest was Highfield North in Leicester with £12,500. The two areas are 30 miles from each other and ranked 7200 places apart.

The wealthiest area of the SE was northern Abingdon in Oxfordshire with £44,900. This ranked the area 35th out of the 7,201 areas recorded. The poorest area of the region was the Portsea area of Portsmouth with £18,400. This area was ranked 6,337 out of the 7,201 areas recorded.

Unlike most regions of the UK, output per hour in the SE was above the UK average. Productivity in the SE was 9.1% above the norm which ranked the region second in the UK. The SE and London record high levels of hours worked and their high productivity pulls up the UK average so much that all other regions fall below it.

The ONS has now released data for a longer period and at a subregional level. This gives further insight into the SE’s performance.

Perhaps the most useful is the 2018 results for the 44 enterprise regions in the UK which comprise the 38 English local enterprise partnerships (LEPs) and six enterprise regions in Scotland, Wales and the border regions.

The region’s Thames Valley Berkshire LEP had the best productivity (in terms of hours and jobs) in 2018 at 35% above the UK average whereas the West Midland’s Black Country LEP at 24% below was the worst.

Eight of the 44 enterprise regions in the UK recorded productivity above the UK average; four of the SE’s seven LEPs were in this category. After Thames Valley Berkshire, the next best was Enterprise M3 ranked third at +20%, then Coast to Capital sixth at +5% followed by Solent eighth at +3%. Buckinghamshire Thames Valley LEP (-0.2%), Oxfordshire LEP (-4%) and the South East LEP (-7%) were ranked 9th, 14th and 18th.

In terms of productivity growth between 2010 and 2018 the Coventry and Warwickshire LEP was top with growth of 16%. Twelve economic regions recorded productivity levels lower in 2018 than 2010. The worst performer was the SE’s Buckinghamshire Thames Valley LEP which saw productivity drop by 11%.

More generally the SE’s results for productivity growth were mixed. With growth of 6%, Enterprise M3 was the eighth best in the UK, one place above Thames Valley Berkshire, and the Solent LEP was ranked 27th nationally with growth of 2%, Four of the region’s LEPs recorded productivity levels lower in 2018 than 2010; the South East at -0.2% was ranked 34th, four places above Coast to Capital LEP which recorded -1.5%. The -6% drop in productivity in Oxfordshire was only worse in Gloucestershire and, as mentioned above, in Buckinghamshire Thames Valley LEP.

Three of the SE’s four subregions recorded productivity above the UK average. Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire +17%, Hampshire and Isle of Wight +12% and Surrey, East and West Sussex +6%. Kent was just below at -3%.

At county level, led by North Hampshire (+44%), eleven of the SE’s economic regions recorded productivity above the UK average. The other ten areas dropped below the UK average, with East Sussex recording the lowest productivity at -27%.

The growth in hours worked between 2010 and 2018 in Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire was 18%, beating Kent which recorded 11% and Surrey, East and West Sussex on 8%. In UK terms this level of growth was in the top half of the country’s 40 subregions with Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire ranked fifth. With growth of 6% Hampshire and Isle of Wight was ranked 34th.

If the increase in economic output is also factored in then the sub regional performances are mixed. Hampshire and Isle of Wight was ranked 20th in the UK with growth of 2%, one place above Surrey, East and West Sussex, with Kent placed 29th with 1% growth, one place above Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire.

More data from the ONS showed unemployment in the region was 7,000 higher at 156,000 between November and January; the uplift of 0.1% took the overall rate to 3.2%. Northern Ireland had the lowest rate of 2.4%, the North East the highest with 6.2%, with the UK rate at 3.9%.

The South East finally overtook the South West and had the highest employment rate at 80% which compared with 79.9% in the SW; the UK rate was 76.5%. Over 4.7m are employed in the SE.

The SE’s average property price decreased by 1.2% to £320,700, which took the annual decrease to 0.5%. In comparison, UK prices decreased by 1.1% to £231,185 during January, an annual growth rate of 1.3%.

The Henleaze and Barton Hill areas of Bristol are the wealthiest and poorest areas of the region, Cornwall LEP records the second best productivity growth in the UK and the SW loses its employment crown

Reading Time: 3 minutes

The ONS has published average household disposal income estimates for England and Wales in 2018. The incomes shown are after tax and housing costs are taken off.  The analysis has shown that 87% of local areas had an average household income of between £22,500 and £39,200; within this over a third were between £28,000 and £33,600.

Of the 50 areas with the highest total incomes, 41 were in London with the lowest incomes more widely spread geographically across England and Wales. The North East, East England, London, and the South East had no local areas in the bottom 50.

The wealthiest area in England and Wales was Mickleover in Derby with incomes of £52,200 and the poorest was Highfield North in Leicester with £12,500. The two areas are 30 miles from each other and ranked 7200 places apart.

The wealthiest area of the SW was the Henleaze area of Bristol with £40,600. This ranked the area 147th out of the 7,201 areas recorded. The poorest area of the region was also in Bristol, Barton Hill, with £15,600. This area was ranked 7,155 out of the 7,201 areas of the UK recorded.

Like most regions of the UK, output per hour in the SW is below the UK average. Productivity per hour in the region was 9.8% below the UK average which ranked the region sixth nationally for 2018. One reason for this is the high levels of hours worked and high productivity in London and South East which pulls up the UK average so much that all other regions fall below it.

The ONS has now released data for a longer period and at a subregional level. This gives further insight into the SW’s performance.

Perhaps the most useful is the 2018 results for the 44 enterprise regions in the UK which comprise the 38 English local enterprise partnerships (LEPs) and six enterprise regions in Scotland, Wales and the border regions.

Thames Valley Berkshire LEP had the best productivity (in terms of hours and jobs) in 2018 at 35% above the UK average whereas the Black Country LEP at 24% below was the worst.

At 10% above, the Swindon and Wiltshire LEP was one of eight economic regions which beat the UK average and was ranked 4th, the region’s other LEPs recorded productivity below the UK average. West of England was 11th at 1% below, the other four LEPs all performed poorly and ranged from 11% to 24% below the UK average. Dorset, Gloucestershire and Heart of the South West LEPs were ranked 26th, 27th and 34th. Cornwall at 24% below was ranked 43rd, the second worst in the UK.

In terms of productivity growth between 2010 and 2018 the Coventry and Warwickshire LEP was top with growth of 16%. Twelve economic regions recorded productivity levels lower in 2018 than 2010. The worst performer was the Buckinghamshire Thames Valley LEP which saw productivity drop by 11%.

The SW’s results for productivity growth were more mixed. With growth of 10% the Cornwall LEP was the second best in the UK. The Swindon and Wiltshire LEP was ranked 14th nationally with growth of 4%, beating the Heart of the South West which was ranked 22nd with 2% growth. West of England was a little behind at 25th with Dorset at 0% growth which ranked it 33rd.  The only one of the region’s LEPs which recorded productivity levels lower in 2018 than 2010 was Gloucestershire at -8%. The ranking of 43rd only beat Buckinghamshire Thames Valley LEP.

Despite this all of the SW’s four subregions recorded productivity below the UK average. Gloucestershire, Wiltshire and Bath/Bristol area -1%, Devon -16%, Dorset and Somerset -16% and Cornwall and Isles of Scilly -18%.

At a county level, with the exception of Swindon (+40%) and Bath and North East Somerset, North Somerset and South Gloucestershire (+7%) all of the SW’s economic regions recorded productivity below the UK average. Torbay had the lowest productivity, 26% below the UK average.

The growth in hours worked between 2010 and 2018 in Gloucestershire, Wiltshire and Bath/Bristol area was 13%, beating Dorset and Somerset which recorded 12%. In UK terms this level of growth was in the top half of the country’s 40 subregions. Cornwall and Isles of Scilly grew 7% and Devon grew 6% which ranked them in the bottom ten of the UK.

If the increase in economic output is also factored in then the sub regional performances are good, mirroring the region’s LEPs. Cornwall and Isles of was ranked 3rd in the UK with growth of 10%, Devon was placed 18th with 3%, Dorset and Somerset 25th with 2%  and Gloucestershire, Wiltshire and Bath/Bristol 32nd with 0.4%. 

More data from the ONS showed unemployment in the region was 10,000 higher at 87,000 between November and January; the uplift of 0.3% took the overall rate to 3.0%, the second best in the UK. Northern Ireland had the lowest rate of 2.4%, the North East the highest at 6.2%, with the UK rate at 3.9%.

The South East overtook the region and had the highest employment rate at 80% which compared with 79.9% in the SW where 2.8m are employed; the UK rate was 76.5%.

The SW’s average property price decreased by 1.8% to £254,320, which took the annual decrease to 0.1%. In comparison, UK prices decreased by 1.1% to £231,185 during January, an annual growth rate of 1.3%.